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  • #103791
    Anonymous

    I’m currently working my way through the IFR Courses – they are long term, talking years to work my way through. I’ve founds parts of it useful, it’s a case of trial and error, i tend to pick out the parts i find useful and incorporate them in my daily routine.

    I’m just a novice, but if anyone comes up with any useful stuff or corrects me if i’ve got things wrong – by all means share the information, everyone has a lot to gain by discussion.

    i’m currently memorising all 12 “minor 7 flat 5 (half diminished) arpeggios. The only reason i’m memorising all the types of chords (or arpeggios) – major, dominant 7, minor 7, half diminished, diminished, augmented is because i got fed up of looking through music sheets and fumbling trying to work out what chords are on the sax.

    #103794
    john
    Keymaster

    ya that’s what everyone should practice and know inside out; all scales, chords, arppegios.
    eveyone will tell any music student that. it’s what I worked on daily for years. I don’t think a lot of people do it tho.
    it’s amazing how much theory you learn after that. it’s practically all one needs to know about music.

    #103799
    RockinRobin
    Participant

    I’m doing this in all 12 keys and this the order i play. Daily practice.

    1 3 2 4 3 5 4 6 5 7 6 8 7 9 8
    e.g F A G Bb A C Bb D C Eb E D F Eb G F or C E D F E G F A G B A C B D C
    William

    #103801
    saxomonica
    Participant
    #103825
    Anonymous

    That’s a good exercise William in all 12 Keys.

    I bought 84 backing tracks, for each of the 7 different Modes there are backing tracks for each of the 12 scales (ie 7 x 12 = 84 tracks).

    So each day i pick 2 new scales (ex F & Gb) then i practice going up and down the sax (from low Bb up to altissimo D, depending on where each mode starts and ends) for each of the 7 different mode backing tracks.

    Practicing each of the 7 modes in one scale with representative backing tracks for each of the 7 modes is quite interesting, as each of the 7 mode backing tracks sound different. ex if you play up and down mode 1 in C major you can feel with the track the natural resting place is on note 1 (ie C), where as if you play up and down mode 2 in c major you can feel the natural resting place is no longer note 1, but note 2 instead (ie D) with the backing track. Although Both tracks are in the C major scale yet you feel as if you want to end properly on a different note and not always end on the C note.

    Playing the modes without a mode backing track, you don’t experience how intense the modes are, and how bad the sound is if you pick the wrong mode for a track, it just doesn’t sound right.

    the chords for each of the 7 modes in Scale C
    c,e,g,b – 1,3,5,7
    d,f,a,c – 1,3b,5,7b
    e,f,g,a – 1,3b,5b,7
    f,g,a,b – 1,3,5,7#
    g,a,b,c – 1,3,5,7
    a,b,c,d – 1,3,5b,7b
    b,c,d,e – 1,3b,5b,7b

    the 1st mode and the 5th mode share the same pattern (1,3,5,7) , so you can see why the 1st and the 5th chords have a close sounding relationship and the pattern of the 4th mode is 1,3,5,7# so you can see why the 4th chord sounds well with the 1st and 5th chords which makes the I-IV-V progression sound so nice and natural.

    #103835
    Anonymous

    correction (you can see why i am a novice)

    the chords for each of the 7 modes in Scale C

    c,e,g,b – 1,3,5,7
    d,f,a,c – 1,3b,5,7b
    e,g,b,d -1,3b,5,7b
    f,a,c,e – 1,3,5,7
    g,b,d,f – 1,3,5,7b
    a,c,e,g – 1,3b,5,7b
    b,d,f,a – 1,3b,5b,7b

    playing the 1st 4 notes of each mode in Scale C

    c,d,e,f – 1,3,5,7
    d,e,f,g – 1,3,5b,7
    e,f,g,a – 1,3b,5b,7
    f,g,a,b – 1,3,5,7#
    g,a,b,c – 1,3,5,7
    a,b,c,d – 1,3,5b,7
    b,c,d,e – 1,3b,5b,7

    the 1st mode and the 4th mode share the same pattern (1,3,5,7) , so you can see why the 1st and the 4th chords have a close sounding relationship and the pattern of the 5th mode is 1,3,5,7b so you can see why the 5th chord sounds well with the 1st and 4th chords and creates a bit of tension, which makes the I-IV-V progression sound so nice and natural.

    #103840
    Anonymous

    correction, correction, correction (i’m definitely a novice)

    the chords for each of the 7 modes in Scale C

    c,e,g,b – 1,3,5,7
    d,f,a,c – 1,3b,5,7b
    e,g,b,d -1,3b,5,7b
    f,a,c,e – 1,3,5,7
    g,b,d,f – 1,3,5,7b
    a,c,e,g – 1,3b,5,7b
    b,d,f,a – 1,3b,5b,7b

    playing the 1st 4 notes of each mode in Scale C

    c,d,e,f – 1,2,3,4
    d,e,f,g – 1,2,3b,4
    e,f,g,a – 1,2b,3b,4
    f,g,a,b – 1,2,3,4#
    g,a,b,c – 1,2,3,4
    a,b,c,d – 1,2,3b,4
    b,c,d,e – 1,2b,3b,4

    the 1st mode and the 4th mode share the same pattern (1,3,5,7) , so you can see why the 1st and the 4th chords have a close sounding relationship and the pattern of the 5th mode is 1,3,5,7b so you can see why the 5th chord sounds well with the 1st and 4th chords and creates a bit of tension, which makes the I-IV-V progression sound so nice and natural.

    #103874
    RockinRobin
    Participant

    So I looked in my Sax Classics music book. “Night Train”. Slow Swing in Bb. Lots of 1 5 4 and 1 4.Sheet music is about the same as Johnny’s. Trying to not drive the house members crazy blowing the High D. “Night Train” is a good one to learn.
    William

    #103887
    Anonymous

    I’ve got loads of stuff learn about the blues, which i’ll start working through, when i’ve finished memorising 72 chords (arpeggios), just got 24 more chords to go. The more you practice these chords over and over, the less time you spend trying to remember what notes make up the chords from the theory.

    “What’d i say” is also a nice tune to work, in Johnny’s list of music.

    #103908
    Anonymous

    1 4 1 1 (A7 D7 A7 A7)
    4 4 1 1 (D7 D7 A7 A7)
    5 4 1 1 (E7 D7 A7 A7)

    here’s a variation of the blues, using a 2-5-1 progression

    1 4 1 1 (A7 D7 A7 A7)
    4 4 1 1 (D7 D7 A7 A7)
    2 5 1 1 (Bm7 E7 A7 A7)

    Also when playing the notes in a chord,

    instead of playing each Chord as 1 3 5 7b notes and starting on the 1 note (ex playing a C Chord, play notes C E G Bb)

    try playing each Chord starting on the 3 note instead of the 1 note as 3 5 6 5 notes
    ex playing a C Chord, play notes E G A G sounds nice where the 3 5 6 are played as 1/8th notes (counting 1and2 and34)

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